Radishes, Three Ways

Never Too Busy

by Chef Deb Traylor

It’s an exciting time here at Ginger and Baker with so much going on! The building is getting closer and closer to completion and the team is growing exponentially as we bring on new management staff. There are still a million and one things to do and even with so many extra hands on board, it’s hard to imagine life being anything but very busy.

Busy is a way of life isn’t it? It’s easy to forget little traditions when we’re busy. It’s easy to put off doing something because something more urgent presents itself. It’s hard to imagine not being “busy.”

So, I have this sweet little date with my daughters every year on a summer Saturday. I began taking them to my local farmers’ market twelve years ago, when it was a just few dozen farmers and not too many people in attendance. It was during those early days that I began sharing with the girls the importance of food, farms and a community that supports our local agricultural economy.

It’s been twelve years of amazing produce and locally made breads, cheeses and jams. Twelve years of buying locally roasted coffee and fresh flowers. Twelve years of watching our little farmers’ market become a destination, and seeing how farming families we’ve known have grown.

Twelve years.

My daughters are now young adults. College, jobs and boyfriends have filled their lives, and like their mom… they are now “busy.”

That is, until an early morning on a summer Saturday when they’ll both pop their heads into my room and ask, “Aren’t we going to the farmers’ market this morning?”

The answer is, and will always be, “Yes!”  Whatever I have to do can wait.

With that in mind, here are three ways to take a little time to enjoy the season’s crisp, peppery radishes. Sautéeing gives them an added sweetness and flavor, while pairing fresh radishes with good butter and sea salt offers a delicious reminder to savor simplicity.

Sautéed Radishes (hot)

  • 2 bunches fresh radishes, washed and cut into quarters
  • 2 Tbsp. unsalted butter
  • 1 tsp. chopped fresh herbs (dill, thyme or cilantro)
  • kosher or sea salt & fresh pepper

Melt butter in a medium sauté pan over medium-high heat. When butter begins to bubble, add radishes and sauté for 3-4 minutes. Radishes will begin to color but will remain slightly crisp. Season with fresh herbs, salt and pepper. Serve immediately.

Sautéed Radishes (cold)

  • 2 bunches fresh radishes, washed and cut into quarters
  • 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp. chopped fresh herbs (parsley, chives or cilantro)
  • kosher or sea salt & fresh pepper
  • 1-2 Tbsp. white balsamic vinegar

Heat olive oil in a medium sauté pan over medium-high heat for one minute. Add radishes and sauté for 3-4 minutes. Radishes will begin to color but will remain slightly crisp. Remove pan from heat and allow vegetables to cool. Once cool, sprinkle with fresh herbs, salt and pepper.  Drizzle with balsamic vinegar and additional olive oil, if desired. Serve at room temp.

Radish, Butter & Salt Crostini

  • 6-8 radishes, chopped
  • 1/2 cup cold unsalted butter, chopped
  • 1 tsp. fleur de sel or coarse kosher salt (we like Maldon)
  • ½ tsp. freshly ground pepper
  • 1 baguette or rustic loaf, sliced and toasted

Combine chopped radish and butter with 1/2 teaspoon of salt and pepper. Or, for vibrant pink color, combine radish, butter, salt and pepper in a food processor and mix briefly. To serve, spread radish butter over toasted baguette slices and sprinkle with remaining salt.

Tender radish seed pods. You can eat them raw, slice and sauté them in olive oil, or make a quick pickle for a picnic. They're also a special treat in summer salads. We leave a few radishes growing in the garden way past a normal harvest as the bees love their flowers. Tender radish seed pods. You can eat them raw, slice and sauté them in olive oil, or make a quick pickle for a picnic. They’re also a special treat in summer salads. We leave a few radishes growing in the garden way past a normal harvest as the bees love their flowers.

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